Flight canceled after skipping part of the trip

Joe Dominguez, Multimedia Journalist - Pueblo Chieftain Bureau , j.dominguez@krdo.com
POSTED: 11:56 PM MST Nov 29, 2012    UPDATED: 12:45 AM MST Nov 30, 2012 
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

A Colorado Springs woman found that the round-trip plane ticket she bought her daughter for Thanksgiving lead to a dead end.

Kim Laster bypassed the last leg of her daughter's flight home last Monday. Instead of waiting out a Denver layover, Laster drove north and picked up her daughter Breanna.

It voided the return trip for her daughter and Laster was forced to buy a one-way ticket to get her back to school.

"They still have their money the ticket ticket has been paid for, so I don't know what harm it did anybody," said Laster.

Laster was contacted by United Airlines the day before Breanna was set to return to Kansas City for school and asked if she wanted to buy a new ticket for $508.

She declined and went through another airline instead, but this is not a problem specific to just one carrier.

Travel experts urge ticket buyers to read the fine print of the ticket purchase.

In some cases, it states that says every leg of a trip must be made as planned or the ticket is considered null and void and return trips are simply canceled.

The reason is to avoid "hidden city ticketing" in which people buy a cheaper ticket elsewhere and simply never make the connecting flight.

In this case though, it is usually cheaper to fly to Denver rather than Colorado Springs.

Laster was also angry with the airline because she didn't hear from United until the day before Breanna was set to return to school and not the day she skipped the flight from Denver to Colorado Springs.

"The ticket was paid all the way to Springs, so I really didn't see the harm in picking her up in Denver," said Laster.