COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

Baby boomers are waiting longer to retire, pushing back the average retirement age.

"A lot of people are working into their 70s and 80s, are working as consultants because of their great job background, but enjoying life, doing all kinds of fun things," said Robert Stanlick, vice president of America's Retirement Store.

He said there are many reasons why they choose to stay in the workforce, from health care benefits, to an employer's difficulty finding their replacement.

For Rita Kurchinski, who will turn 71 next week, the reason was lifestyle. She retired from her job at the Colorado Mental Health Institute in Pueblo, in 2008. But retirement didn't last.

"For a little bit of time, it was great. I did some volunteering here in the community," she said. "Then I thought 'OK, I love to travel, and if I'm going to travel, then I need to get some extra money.' So then there we go, I'm back in the work force."

Since then, Kurchinski has worked as a caretaker. She also had a job at a downtown Colorado Springs restaurant and at Kissing Camels Golf Course. She is now getting ready to start a new job at Bath and Body Works.

"I love that store, so it's going to be really easy, I think," she said. "It's always exciting to do new things."

The grandmother of eight wants to save up enough money to visit the Greek Isles. She doesn't know when she'll leave the workforce for good.

"I'm very thankful for my health to be able to do this, because some people my age don't have the opportunity to do this," she said. "And I think it means a lot. It really does."