COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

A mother growing marijuana at home to treat her child's cancer is worried a new Colorado bill in the state senate could ban her from doing so.

It was introduced on April 1 trying to define what's called a "drug-endangered child". It's all part of the Colorado Children's Code, hoping to stop child abuse.

Sierra Riddle started growing marijuana in her home a couple weeks ago. She uses the magical butter machine. Her four-year-old son Landon takes cannabis oil for his leukemia. He's been in remission for more than a year.

"It makes me nervous, this bill,” said Riddle.

"If a child is exposed to or is in a home where a controlled substance is or manufactured, used, distributed, those kinds of things, it could be considered as a child abuse situation,” said Republican Senator Bernie Herpin.

The bill says whether drugs are legal or illegal children could be harmed, but in Riddle's situation, she said, “All I'm doing is growing a simple plant trying to help cut costs of how much his cancer treatments are for our family."

"And now that we have it, I could be charged with child abuse or neglect,” she added.

"I think it has some merit. I just want to make sure we properly implement it,” said Senator Herpin.

However, Senator Herpin points out the bill still has some kinks to be worked out.

"Hopefully some of those things can be cleared up in testimony,” he said.

"When you get into the manufacturing, then yes I think something needs to be clear,” said Riddle. "We are not on the dabs side of things at all."

We've seen people making hash oil known as dabs go terribly wrong time and time again. Riddle knows that needs to be regulated as part of the bill.

"I think that it needs to be regulated in such a way that it's regulated for the benefit of the patients, not for the benefit of everybody else's want to be safe,” she said.

The bill will first go to the senate judiciary. Riddle says she and other cannabis supporters hope to speak their minds to senators.