COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

This week a proposal could grant legal protections to businesses that use deadly force against intruders.

It would make an employee immune from any liability if they used deadly force against someone breaking into their business.

"My place was burglarized. I felt violated. I have a lot of clients and I didn't want my clients to be compromised at all. But this bill doesn't give me any more rights than I didn't already have," said Dan Kay, a lawyer in Colorado Springs.

No one was hurt when Kay’s law office was broken into. But he still says ‘no’ to the proposed bill.

"I think it’s a bad idea because it creates the impression for vigilantes," said Kay.  

If passed the bill would protect employees from facing any legal consequences if deadly force was used against intruders.

"I hope that it passes. It would make me feel comfortable that I wasn't going to get in trouble for protecting myself. That I was going to walk away just for protecting me and my coworkers," said Sami Maxwell, an employee at East Coast Deli.

But the idea doesn't make everyone feel safe.

"It creates an avenue for people who are inclined to use deadly force, to give them that avenue. When the statue is already clear that people can defend themselves and that people can defend their businesses. It's unnecessary," said Kay.

“Now is a good time to do this because anywhere you go these days I feel like something could happen. It would be good to be able to feel comfortable to protect yourselves and know that nothing is going to happen to you because I'm sure that’s on a lot of people's minds," said Maxwell.

This bill still needs to be addressed this week, along with another that could restore the right for some felons to carry firearms.