After the surgery, Glogau had the material from her face tested. The UCSF dermatopathology results showed there was some type of "refractile material" found in her cheeks. Glogau describes the material as low-grade "glass or fiberglass." The patient's body was rejecting that material.

After repeated attempts by CNN to contact PMMA.com for a comment about selling non-FDA-approved dermal fillers on its website, PMMA e-mailed, "It has nothing to do with the product but the procedure." Two days later, when CNN went to PMMA.com, all that appeared was a blank white screen and the words: "Access denied."

Scars are a reminder of a bad decision

While Glogau's patient is on the road to recovery, she will always have some visible scars on her face. Glogau has a warning to people considering purchasing dermal fillers themselves. "What we want to do is at least make the patients aware that there is a danger lurking for them out there, and they have to be careful," says Glogau.

Brown considers herself a living example of what happens when you're not careful.

She doesn't hesitate to tell others about how she suffered in extreme pain for five long years after the silicone injections. She explains how she watched her buttocks harden and discolor, seeing doctor after doctor to try to get help. She lifts what's left of her arms and explains what was actually injected in her buttocks.

When her doctors tested the substance injected into her body, Brown says it was bathroom caulk. Brown doesn't know what happened to the woman who injected her.

At 47, Brown has had to learn to do everything all over again with prosthetics. She is able to live on her own with the help of an aide who comes in to help her for a few hours a day.

She doesn't want pity; she wants people to listen to her cautionary story.

"All I would ask them to do is, when you have that first thought, make sure they have a second thought about it and do a little research. And if they still want to do it, go for it. They won't be blindsided, saying, 'Oh, my God, I had no idea that a simple procedure like that can leave me with no hands, no feet and no butt cheeks.'"

Brown has a new mission in life to spread the word about what happened to her and a different mantra: "We are enough and we were made to be enough."