Pueblo

Family and friends react to Chieftain editor's death

PUEBLO, Colo. - Memories and accomplishments for a giant in the Pueblo community have been plastered to a wall, all in the form of photos and newspaper clippings.

Robert Hoag Rawlings worked at the Pueblo Chieftain for 70 years and was its editor for the last 37.
 
"He had a relentless personality. He never got tired, he never got discouraged. He was always just very aggressive," said the Chieftain's managing editor Steve Henson.
  
Henson said Rawlings dedicated his life to the paper and to making sure the Pueblo community was informed.
 
"His real passion was using the newspaper to protect Pueblo and Southern Colorado," Henson said.
  
Rawlings' daughter, Jane, inherited his dedication, working in the footsteps of her father and keeping the Chieftain pulsing.

"He was the kind of dad that said you could be whatever you want to be," Jane said.
  
Condolences are coming in from all levels, such a voicemail from Governor John Hickenlooper in which he said, "Heard about your dad and I am so sorry, I cannot express how sorry I am. It's the end of an era."
  
Senator Lucia Guzman also sending a statement saying, "When I visited him while representing the Senate Democratic caucus, I felt I was sharing time with a wise and dedicated Coloradan. He and I shared a common concern regarding the needs and challenges facing the Lower Arkansas Valley."
  
Many significant projects in Pueblo, including the riverwalk, would not have happened without Rawlings

"He did so many different wonderful things for so many different causes and so many different people," Jane said.
  
It's a life that will be remember for a long time by his staff and the community as a whole. He died on Friday at the age of 92.
 


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