(CNN) -

Some tennis players say they look deep into draws. Others claim they simply look at their next opponent.

But one thing everyone agrees on is that draws can make all the difference.

Take Wimbledon, for example.

When organizers went against the world rankings and named Novak Djokovic as the top seed instead of Rafael Nadal, who was pushed down to No. 2, it helped the former.

Nadal's early path was filled with hard-hitting, dangerous players and the Spaniard suffered yet another upset at the All England Club, losing to Australia's Nick Kyrgios in the fourth round.

Djokovic, meanwhile, had a less bumpy road to the second week and he stepped up his game in the final to top Roger Federer. Federer, of course, wasn't such an easy draw for Djokovic, especially on grass.

The two took part in a five-set classic and without an injured Nadal at the U.S. Open, they'll be expected to meet in the final again in New York in a little over two weeks, despite a recent wobble from Djokovic.

As the top two seeds, they were placed on opposite sides of the draw Thursday, with Djokovic appearing to land in the more difficult half.

He could face 2012 champion Andy Murray or resurgent Rogers Cup winner Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the quarterfinals and either Stan Wawrinka or the big-serving Milos Raonic in the last four.

Wawrinka upset Djokovic on the hard courts of the Australian Open in January and stretched Djokovic to five sets at the U.S. Open last year.

Djokovic, like Murray, isn't in great form, having slumped at warm-up tournaments.

Federer, going for an 18th major, might meet huge servers in the second and third rounds, Sam Groth and Ivo Karlovic, and the highest seed in his quarter is the man who has been compared to the Swiss, Grigor Dimitrov.

In his half lie fourth seed David Ferrer -- Federer is 16-0 against the highest-ranked Spaniard at the tournament in Nadal's absence -- and Tomas Berdych. Although Berdych has ousted Federer in two of their last three encounters, one at the U.S. Open in 2012, he enters the event in poor form and confronts feisty Aussie Lleyton Hewitt in the first round.

In the women's draw, Ana Ivanovic surfaced in the same quarter as Serena Williams, who is trying to reach a grand slam quarterfinal for the first time this season.

Williams crashed out early in Melbourne, Paris and London, but she beat Ivanovic to win the Western & Southern Open in Cincinnati last weekend.

Also in her half are Wimbledon finalists Petra Kvitova and Eugenie Bouchard. Both have struggled since leaving the grass, yet in Bouchard's case that might be due to injury.

Whoever emerges from the fourth quarter will be the favorite to reach the final, and the leading contenders are Simona Halep, Maria Sharapova and Venus Williams.

Sharapova trumped Halep in the French Open final and won another bruising contest in Cincinnati last week.

Venus Williams is an elder stateswoman at 34 but her first-round foe, Japan's Kimiko Date-Krumm, is even older at nearly 44. The last time they met at a major, Venus Williams prevailed 8-6 in the third set at Wimbledon in 2011.